Saint-Pierre-Quiberon: Crazy Foils party

A week dedicated to hydrofoils at Saint-Pierre Quiberon ( France ) . The canton is nestled on a granite strip bordered on the west by the ocean and on the east by the Bay. The sea is always close, a privilege of the shape of the Quiberon peninsula. The most widespread use of hydrofoils in sailboats to date has been in the International Moth class. Andy Paterson of Bloodaxe boats on the Isle of Wight is widely considered to have developed the first functional foiling Moth, though his boat had three foils in a tripod arrangement. Brett Burvill sailed a narrow skiff Moth with inclined surface-piercing hydrofoils to a race win at the Moth World Championships in 2001 in Australia, which was the first time a hydrofoil Moth had won a race at a World Championship. This hydrofoil configuration was later declared illegal by the class, as it was felt to constitute a multihull, which is prohibited by class rules. Initially Ian Ward in Sydney, Australia developed the first centerline foiling Moth which demonstrated that sailing on centerboard and rudder foils alone was feasible. Subsequently, Garth and John Ilett in Perth, Australia developed a two-hydrofoil system for the Moth with active flap control for the main foil via a surface sensor. John’s company Fastacraft was the first to produce a commercially available hydrofoil International Moth.

Report HD – Bretagne Télé – April 15, 2016

 

quiberon 24 television-